Tires used in permeable pavement tops 7.5 million pounds

Tires used in permeable pavement tops 7.5 million pounds

Porous Pave permeable paving can be used for Slopes and in colors that complement landscapes.

Porous Pave recently marked an environmental milestone: surpassing 7.5 million pounds of recycled rubber used in manufacturing its permeable paving material.

An eco-friendly green building product made in the United States, Porous Pave is a highly porous, durable and flexible paving material consisting of recycled rubber, chipped granite aggregate and a liquid binder. The controlled shredding and processing of discarded tires produces the 1/8- to1/4-inch, fine-cut chips of recycled rubber that incorporated into Porous Pave.

"Topping 7.5 million pounds of recycled rubber is an achievement for the environment," Dave Ouwinga, president of Porous Pave, said in a press release. "For us it also signifies the continued confidence of builders, landscape architects and contractors to request, specify and install Porous Pave for a wide range of public, commercial and residential applications of permeable paving."

Porous Pave retains stormwater on site, decreasing the volume and velocity of runoff into storm drains and storm sewers. While the porosity of permeable pavers is limited to only the joints between them, the entire surface of Porous Pave is porous.

It is engineered with up 29 percent total void space. Water drains through it at a tested permeability rate of 5,800 to 6,300 gallons of water per hour per square foot.

With its recycled rubber, Porous Pave is slip resistant and resilient. It will not freeze, heave, crack or crumble. A pour-in-place material that can express any hardscape or landscape plan, Porous Pave offers design versatility and application flexibility. It can be installed on slopes of up to 30 degrees and is available in a variety of permanent and fade-resistant colors.


Topics: Architectural Firms, Building Owners and Managers, Construction Firms, Exteriors, Landscaping Architecture - Design & Maintenance, Urban Planning and Design


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