N.Y. building's facade cleans air

N.Y. building's facade cleans air

Rendering courtesy of 570 broome

New York’s 570 Broome boasts a subtle yet substantial environmentally conscious feature—its façade actually cleans the air. 

The 25-story luxury condo tower in Manhattan's Hudson Square, slated to be completed at the end of 2018, is situated next to New York's traffic-ridden Holland Tunnel. The building is clad in 2,000 square meters of Neolith paneling, a synthetic material with a stone appearance that is coated with a titanium dioxide nanoparticle-based treatment called Pureti, reports Architectural Digest.

Travis Conrad, an architectural consultant for Neolith, said the Pureti-treated panels are self-cleaning and actively altering the chemical makeup of the surrounding air. 

Thanks to Pureti's decontamination and self-cleaning properties, when ultraviolet beams hit the panels, oxygen and water vapor in the atmosphere are converted into superoxide and hydroxyl; superoxide then converts harmful nitrous oxide in the atmosphere into benign nitrates while hydroxyl converts volatile organic compounds and soil into minerals, gas, and water. In short, what begins in the atmosphere as soil, chemicals, and nitrous oxide becomes little more than minerals and water.

Though the chemicals that make up Pureti were discovered some 40 years ago, it wasn't until it was combined with Neolith that it was used on a larger scale.

"The intent is to get as much of the mineral as flat on the surface as possible because (Pureti) has to interact with the moisture in the air and the sunlight," Conrad said.

Spraying the solution on a large, thin sheet of Neolith—where all particles can live at the surface—is ideal. 

"It helps the owners and developers lower the maintenance costs, and it gives a peace of mind to the tenants," architect Tahir Demircioglu said.

 


Topics: Architectural Firms, Building Owners and Managers, Construction Firms, Energy Saving Products, Engineering Firms, Environmental Firms, Exteriors, Multifamily / Multiunit Residential, Sustainable Communities, Technology, Thermal Envelope - Building Envelope, Urban Planning and Design


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