New tool shows value of LEED points

Oct. 11, 2016
New tool shows value of LEED points

A new software program more than five years in the making addresses one of the missing pieces in LEED certification — quantifying the value of going through the process.

At the annual Greenbuild Expo last week in Los Angeles, Impact Infrastructure, a New York-based software supplier; and Autodesk, an investor in that company, introduced a beta version of Autocase for Sustainable Buildings, a web- and research-based software tool that can show building owners and their AEC teams the financial, social, and environmental returns from green strategies and practices, all in real time, reports Building Design and Construction.

In addition, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has created a pilot credit under LEED v.4, called “Informing Design Using Triple Bottom Line Analysis,” that awards cost-benefit evaluations using Autocase that help users determine solutions for optimal returns from earning LEED points.

“What is the value of being green?” asked Mahesh Ramanujam, COO and incoming CEO of USGBC, during a press conference. He answered his own question by pointing out that in a nonresidential sector averse to sharing data, Autocase provides a much-needed measuring stick that is simple and affordable to use, and is informed by LEED’s vision.

Ramanujam framed Autocase as giving more ammunition to users that are weighing the pros and cons of LEED certification at a time when LEED finds itself competing with several other certification programs, some of which are more focused on wellness and post-occupancy comfort and efficiency. Ramanujam suggested as well that Autocase “raises the bar” for any subsequent version of LEED.

John Williams, CEO of Impact Infrastructure, recounted how his company and its strategic partners, which include the third-party certifier Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), had been working on the tool since the beginning of the decade. Early versions were too expensive, so Impact Infrastructure refined the software so it was not only more affordable to a broader customer base, but also much quicker to use.

“What would have cost $250,000 for a custom analysis now costs virtually nothing,” he said. “We’re filling the gap and showing value.” And an analysis that would have taken months to complete is now automated with a few keystrokes for speedy information delivery.

Ryan Meyers, Impact’s chief technology officer and the principal architect of Autocase, gave a brief demonstration of the product, showing how users plug in their own market-specific data, which Autocase applies to its analysis for calculating the savings for owners, occupants and other stakeholders, based on a raft of existing research and case studies.

Much like Turbo Tax, Autocase has an icon at the top of its home page that tells uses how much they gain from green building. For example, if you want to know the value of sustainable water practices or how green building benefits the long-term health of occupants, Autocase can provide a dollar estimate that changes as new data are introduced.

For Johns Hopkins University’s Sustainable Campus Initiative LEED Existing Buildings certification, Autocase was used to analyze energy and water conversation practices — such as efficient lighting, heat recovery, and graywater systems — and prioritized investments to build a case that was used to get budgetary approval.

Dewberry is using this tool for the renovation of its corporate headquarters, said Lidia Berger, MEM, LEED Fellow, LEED AP BD+C, LEED O+M, the engineering firm’s sustainability director.

Sometime in the first quarter of 2017, Impact Infrastructure plans to release a production version of Autocase, along with a similar tool for analyzing and quantifying green infrastructure practices, Meyers said.

 


Topics: Architectural Firms, Associations / Organizations, Automation and Controls, Building Owners and Managers, Certifications, Construction Firms, Consulting - Green & Sustainable Strategies and Solutions, Data Centers - Mission Critical Information Centers, Energy Saving Products, Engineering Firms, Great Commercial Buildings, Healthy & Comfortable Buildings, Sustainable Communities, Sustainable Trends and Statistics, Technology, Urban Planning and Design, USGBC

Companies: U.S. Green Building Council


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