5 energy-saving tips for end of daylight savings

5 energy-saving tips for end of daylight savings

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This weekend – at 2 a.m. Sunday – clocks roll back one hour, returning to Standard Time.

In addition to celebrating the extra hour of sleep, this is also a good time to check batteries in smoke detectors and get mentally prepared for it to be dark out when leaving work for the day.

Here are five energy-saving tips from the U.S. Department of Energy that will help those in commercial facilities save money on utility bills:

1) SOLAR HEATING IS LIKE FREE MONEY

Those with southern exposures in their buildings can open curtains on south-facing windows during the day. That allows sunlight to heat the structure, reducing the effort the furnace has to make (even if the thermostat is turned down). Just be sure to close the curtains at night to reduce the chilling effect from cold windows.

2) COVER DRAFTY WINDOWS

Get a heavy-duty, clear plastic sheet or film from a do-it-yourself store. Tape it over the inside frame of your windows, and make sure it’s sealed all the way around. If you can feel any air blowing in, tape up that spot. By keeping cold air from blowing in, you’ll prevent the heater from working overtime.

3) ADJUST THE TEMPERATURE

When at work, set the thermostat as low as is comfortable, and then turn it down lower when workers leave for the day. A facility can save up to 10 percent on heating bills. Those with a programmable thermostat can set it to do all the work for the occupants.

4) FIND AND SEAL LEAKS

A building probably has more holes in it than most think. Plumbing pipes, gaps around chimneys or vents, and even recessed lights in the ceiling often have spaces that allow air in from outside. Seal these and reap dividends. While at it, wrap insulation around any exposed water pipes outside; it will help keep them from freezing.

5) LOWER WATER HEATING COSTS

Water heating accounts for almost one-fifth of the energy used in a building. Here’s how to save: Turn down the temperature of water heaters to the warm setting (120 degrees F). It will get just as effective, but cost less.

 


Topics: Associations / Organizations, Automation and Controls, Building Owners and Managers, Great Commercial Buildings, Healthy & Comfortable Buildings, Sustainable Communities, Technology, Urban Planning and Design

Companies: U.S. Department of Energy


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